Loading ...

Objectively Linking Player Development Plans to Performance Analysis | Welcome and General | ConnectedCoaches

ConnectedCoaches uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to the use of the cookies. For more details about cookies how we manage them and how you can delete them see the 'Use of cookies' part of our privacy policy. Click the cross to close this cookie notice. X

ad
Home » Groups » Welcome and General » blogs » Anonymous » Objectively Linking Player Development Plans to Performance Analysis
Welcome and General

Leave group:

Are you sure you want to leave this space?

Join this group:

Join this space?

Add a new tab

Add a hyperlink to the space navigation. You can link to internal or external web pages. Enter the Tab name and Tab URL. Upload or choose an icon. Then click Save.

The name that will appear in the space navigation.
The url can point to an internal or external web page.
Login to follow, share, and participate in this group.
Not a member?Join now

Objectively Linking Player Development Plans to Performance Analysis

4.79 
 /5
Avg: 4.79 / 5 (1votes)

So about 3 years ago I took up a combined analyst and senior coaching role at Derby County Ladies FC, who played in the FA Women's Premier League and had just taken on John Griffiths (now England Womens National U17 Coach) who would act as the director of football and senior coach for the season. The team were finishing in the bottom half of the table and had ambitions of becoming a WSL side. Under John's reign, one of the most intriguing ideas was to objectify performance through performance analysis. 

My blog post will not necessarily reflect a lot of research but more a case study around my personal experiences with players that I've worked with. 

Those who have access to video content and footage from games will appreciate the enormous power that performances analysis has not just at elite level but at grassroots too. Our main aims were to introduce a new playing philosophy (which was 4 simple points):

To play with progressive possession based understanding, adaptability and expression, being holistically able to cope under pressure no matter the state game.
To be more sporting and competitive than the opposition with less aggression and fewer fouls.

To be a good citizen with respect for all and have a commitment to learning.

To understand winning and losing games but not at the compromise of the first three.
Within this playing philosophy, each player had a personal development plan which was 3 fold;
  • What players wanted to stay doing
  • What players wanted to stop doing
  • What players wanted to start doing

Each players wrote 2 or 3 bullet points based on the above development aspects. Before I go on, I want to say that this work is largely influenced by top sports psychologist Dan Abrahams. We also used his 3 F's (Fun, Freedom and Focus) as well as eventually adding in the most important F; Family. 

Often within games, coaches only typically remember 42% of the events within the game. We wanted to do some basic stats around final third entries, penalty and zone 14 (outside the attacking box), zone 5 entries (inside the defending penalty box) and basic possession stats. Those were our Key Performance Indicators, often known as KPI's. However, we viewed each player within that as an individual project. Each player had their own journey, and had their own idiosyncracies within the environment. Too often, performances are based on what I call Faction. These are ideas that we think are facts, based on our beliefs, experiences and influences without any real substance or evidence. 

Our framework was firstly the philosophy, but more importantly the player development plans. At the club, getting players to monitor their own performance on the same night on the YouTube channel was immensely powerful. A few years ago UEFA ran a study on the top european coaches competing in the Champions League and asked them to analyse games. When coaches watched individual players instead of the team or the ball, they significantly saw a lot more key events and insights in performance than attaching their emotions to mistakes, negative events and the scoreline. This allowed coaches to appreciate the game holistically. 

So, how else did we implement and monitor these development plans?

Players had their development plans reviewed every 6 weeks in group and 1to1 meetings with coaches. I worked with players to clip up their development points. Players developmental points were used as challenges within training. For example, if a player had a bullet point of not having their back to goal when receiving the ball and had time to adjust their body, then free kicks were awarded against them in training if they were lazy in their learning...! (see my other blog post; Do we really know how to utilise the constraints led approach?). Players also used their development points as match day challenges in their 'match scripts' (which I eventually laminated for each player so they could create their own). 

As you can imagine, the results were phenomenal and players' learning accelerated so much within months. Players had a shift in culture and were so committed to the environment because they had ownership of their learning. Performance analysis sessions were beginning to become positively welcomed and players attended even if they were injured. We could see what we deemed success, appearing on so many levels.

Objectively, the team reach their highest finish in the WPL, finishing 7th which was a huge success after battling with relegation. Implicitly, we achieved so many milestones within that season and everyone connected with the club at that time will always hold it as a really positive experience. 

Hopefully in this blog I've made what seems the untangible a little more objective at least, and is an idea that can be used at both an elite and grassroots level. 

FUN + DEVELOPMENT = SUCCESS

                   (WINNING)

Please see attached documents that are some of the things we used for our players. 

Anything that you can personally connect with, or may consider in the future?

Rich

If you enjoyed this you can find all my other ConnectedCoaches blogs here.

Login to follow, share, comment and participate. Not a member? Join for free now.

Comments (6)

   
timhpal
Hi Richard - thanks for sharing this. It's really insightful look at a part of your coaching process.
I was wondering, do you ever have issues with players listing very generic or unspecific goals? I can imagine this is something that comes up, and was wondering what strategies you had to have players understand the need for measurable, specific objectives.
18/01/16
 · 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
   
Richard2591
Hi Tim, great question. I have had this issue with some younger players particularly as I do these plans with 5-11 year olds. The header at the top of the development plan document asks players to be specific about their development. If they were too vague then this creates faction and ambiguity. For example, if a player just bullet pointed 'attacking 1v1' then this could mean attacking when the defender is in front, to the side, behind or on the angle. So it's really important to bullet point their development because otherwise it can flaw the concept.

However, it's also about knowing your players. Some players will struggle to delineate their weaknesses, so you can work with them to agree some targets and tangible things they could either stay, stop or start doing. Particularly working with senior players, they will appreciate the smaller the detail the greater effect it will have on the performance of them and the team. I also trialled an app called the S20 app which helps coaches identify KPI's within games, however we found out we could actually create our own template. Also when the players did their objectives, we had them all in one room and at first they all took their piece of paper to one corner...! However we encouraged them to collaborate, because if a striker knows that the centre midfielder wants to run with the ball more and loses it, then they won't get as frustrated because they know it's one of their learning points. So getting players to collaborate their objectives is key, especially within different ranks and units in the team. Hope that helps?
18/01/16
 · 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
   
LawrieOK
Hi Richard - I tried to open your three attachments but nothing appeared. are the links still functioning? Thx.
26/01/16
 · 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
   
robertkmaaye
Hi Lawrie. I have tested in a couple of browsers and the attachment links are working for me. I will email them across to you now
27/01/16
 · 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
   
sophia
This is an example of great coaching and thank you for sharing. It illustrates a deep level of what I call "individualised coaching". I know from experience this helps athletes to thrive. Coaches who care for their athletes' personal development as a performer (and as a person) are likely to commit wholeheartedly and work their hardest. The approach you describes engages the athletes and allows them not only to give 110% but also genuinely and purposefully connect with the coaches, the goals set, the direction the entire team is going. Excellent!
27/01/16
 · 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
   
Richard2591
Hi Sophia, thanks for the comment. You've summarised really well that essentially it is individual coaching, I'm exploring more ways to A) Monitor this and B) Develop more ways to connect players with their learning and the game. One of the things I identified in the shift in culture was the perspective of the players about performance and learning. Those who weren't in the team aimed to develop themselves instead of focusing on getting into the team, and allowed the rest to take care of itself! The team 'spirit' and more so harmony was probably the best I've ever been involved with..!
28/01/16
 · 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by
   
cchapman
Hi Richard, Thanks for taking the time to share the process you work through with your players and how it helps them to develop and grow within your coaching environment. A great example of how consistency, connectivity and cohesion ensure that coaching practice and long term planning remain aligned to coaching philosophy and long term aims. A great read and I will be sharing :-)
07/07/16
 · 
 /5
Avg: 0 / 5 (0votes)
by