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Want to get great at something? Get a coach | Atul Gawande | Welcome and General

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Comments (11)

   
Ralph

he also has 4 books, coaches would improve their standards by reading Checklist and Better
the other two are worth a read but more medical based

05/01/18
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Wendyrussell

Great listen! I am always learning and wanting to improve and get better.

Does this someone have to be a "coach" or someone who is "more qualified" than you to give you advice and feedback.

The element he talk about when having an other set of eyes interested me. Someone from the outside just watching, and asking you questions to get you to think about your practice. Could this be the players themselves, a coach from another sport, and assistant coach. Would this dialogue develop you but also them, especially if with your athletes or players? Would the later lead to having a mixtures of both style he spoke about?
Everyone needs a coach and the violin teacher style "learn and develop for yourselves"

06/01/18
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CoachMackay

Facilitator's is a word that coaches use. Making a joint learning environment works, if you are not refreshed and looking forward to planning your next session, you need to reflect and try to find where facilitating went into coaching. Learn along with your people, yes ask the window cleaner what they thought they may be able to brighten up yourday letting the sunlight in.

06/01/18
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IanMahoney

It is well known fact that someone on the outside looking in is invaluable. If things are not happening even if you are doing everything correct, someone who is not experienced as you in the field can see things that should be corrected. I often ask my athletes, parents and bystanders, could I have done things better? What would have you done if you was in charge of this session? This allows me to 'tailor' the session for individuals (so and athlete centred approach) and allows me to evolve as a coach,

06/01/18
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RichardBowles

Very interesting talk. It highlights, in a coaching context, the importance of reflection and continuous improvement. But how might this reflection be developed? Maybe by having coaches work collaboratively in a "community of practice" might be one way. Or by having a mentor to offer another perspective on a regular basis. Or, as Ian suggests in the previous post, getting frequent feedback from players can be a powerful way to support reflection.

06/01/18
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Ralph

'a well known fact';
not in my 35years experience,
or as my dad used to say; 'opinions are like bum-holes, everyone's got one.
we are living in an age where, everyones opinion needs to be respected and listened to,
no matter how wrong and unqualified,
i'd rather be taught by an expert coach than, an opinionated bystander.
not everyone looking in is valuable and more often destructive,
although 35years experience, i still wouldn't call it a fact, anecdotal evidence is nearly the worst kind
Atul's video bystander is a retired surgical professor (rather than the hospital porter)
and i'm sure Atul pre-selected someone he highly respected;
and i'm of the opinion; 'your not a coach, if you're not mentoring someone.'

08/01/18
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Sukhmishra

I read it somewhere, " We can't see what we cannot see, after all we are human", and thus an "extra pair of eyes" will definitely help. Equally important is the player's openness to feedback and giving psychological permission to the coach to share what's being observed. What good is the observation if the coach doesn't get to share for lack of courage or acceptance.

10/01/18
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lornacumbria

Following on from Sukh Mishra...I recently observed a session led by another coach, and saw several areas for improvement. There were positive aspects too on which I could feed back. It became clear quickly that the coach wasn't keen to hear what I had to say - I have to admit my courage failed when I realised the openness wasn't there. Having watched this excellent presentation and read the comments, I will go back to this coach and try again to pass on my observations. The fact the coach is unwilling to reflect is an issue too. Nothing will change if I cannot share the observation, some of which regarded safety aspects. Thank you.

25/02/18
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Ralph

good luck Lorna, none so blind as those that won't see;
yet, this is the art of great coaching,
i'd be interested in your approach to a fellow peer, what your strategy is going to be for success.
let us know what happens

25/02/18
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lornacumbria

Thank you Ralph. So, having decided I couldn't let it slide, I emailed the coach in question to ask for a suitable time when I could share my observations. To my surprise, the reply came back with some thoughts of her own on the session. I replied with delight that she had reflected on the session, as reflection and self-evaluation is the way to progress as a coach. I was able to respond to most of her points with encouragement that she was on the right track. However, secondly, I have decided it is time the club brought in some flying coaches from England Athletics for all coaches as an external expert will have a different relationship with all coaches, and I won't have to deliver the feedback!

As a volunteer co-ordinator of other volunteers, actioning development requires diplomacy...

What do you think?

10/03/18
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Sukhmishra

Congrats Lorna for your courage and decision to share feedback. Reflecting with another coach or a coach supervisor has always served me as a coach.

11/03/18
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Ralph

Not bad Lorna, great you got the result you want, should be end of story and is, sort of...
you were let off the hook?
what would you have done in a situation where you didn't get such an agreeable e-mail and you did have to have that difficult meeting?
true things require diplomacy, but the rule is;
"one can't compromise with those that are uncompromising"
and sport is full of uncompromising people, it's mistakenly seen as a strength by some

11/03/18
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