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How do I tell a parent that shouting 'try harder' is not helping? | Coaching Children (Ages 5-12)

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Home » Groups » Coaching Children (Ages 5-12) » Forum » Managing Parents » How do I tell a parent that shouting 'try harder' is not helping?
Coaching Children (Ages 5-12)

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Posted in: Managing Parents

How do I tell a parent that shouting 'try harder' is not helping?

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  • One of the child's parents is a supportive fundraiser of my club. And he is enthusiastic about encouraging his child to do well in sport. But he shouts words such as, 'You need to get stuck in' at his child. I think this reduces the child's confidence levels - the child thinks he is already trying his best.

    Is it OK to ask committed parents who shout to remain quiet?

    Acting Community Manager
  • Yes if you can explain the impact and suggest alternatives. But it helps if you can prevent it rather than cure it.

    Acting Community Manager
  • andrewb62
      Answered
    On 10/11/14 22:05, Melanie Mallinson said:

    Is it OK to ask committed parents who shout to remain quiet?

    "Spectator education", I think, rather than suppression.  The parents need to know what you (the coach and/or the Club) are trying to achieve, and then for them to encourage behaviours that support the group's objectives.

    Not easy, I know.

    Stuart Lancaster was very interesting on this topic, at @sportscoachuk’s #alldaytalentbreakfast back in 2012 - he spoke about the need to actively teach “connection and extension”, to spread understanding of the "culture" throughout the coaches and other support staff, the playing team, to the committees and admin staff, right on to the crowd at Twickenham, and even to the whole country.

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